Lockedare all 350 ranchers hard to start in cold weather?

Post
rancher man08
Mud Maniac
2008/12/22 21:54:16
my 350  rancher is a **** to start to in cold weather is that normal?,and another thing it ticks at start up for a few seconds and then goes away are the valves out of adjustment?
foreman4020
Mud Master
RE: are all 350 ranchers hard to start in cold weather? 2008/12/22 22:05:06
all of my hondas have been cold callard its always been that way lol
kodiak660
Respected Member
RE: are all 350 ranchers hard to start in cold weather? 2008/12/23 00:08:16
My old 01 Rancher would need the choke when it was 80 degrees out. [:D]

You can up the pilot jet size one or two and cure it.
outlanderrider
Mud Master
RE: are all 350 ranchers hard to start in cold weather? 2008/12/23 00:34:12
Mine starts fine when the **** choke doesn't freeze up. [&o]
kodiak660
Respected Member
RE: are all 350 ranchers hard to start in cold weather? 2008/12/23 00:54:50
ORIGINAL: outlanderrider

Mine starts fine when the **** choke doesn't freeze up. [&o]


$15 fix is a new choke cable.
ARK_SWAMP_RIDER
Super Swamper
RE: are all 350 ranchers hard to start in cold weather? 2008/12/23 07:05:10
There's a primer button on it, not sure which side, but it will be on the carb. It's on the right side, you have to get off the quad and look at the motor from the side and you will see a black push button. You can press it a couple times and it really helps it start on those cold mornings.
RE: are all 350 ranchers hard to start in cold weather? 2008/12/23 09:58:03
ORIGINAL: rancher man08

my 350  rancher is a **** to start to in cold weather is that normal?,and another thing it ticks at start up for a few seconds and then goes away are the valves out of adjustment?

 
Your not the only one. Mine does the same thing. When its really cold, it is alittle hard to start and ticks a bit then she's fine. The only thing that I did was change the spark plug. That seemed to help a bit.
outlanderrider
Mud Master
RE: are all 350 ranchers hard to start in cold weather? 2008/12/23 10:36:34
Just went out to do some riding.. couldn't get it started. After a bunch of tries with just the primer, because the choke is still froze, it fired for maybe 1 second and then quit. Then the starter wasn't turning the motor over as fast as it was before. Had to resort to the pull start, which didn't work worth a ****. It's pulled all the way out and won't retract. What to do? [&o]

thanks
CarterB123
Trail Rider
RE: are all 350 ranchers hard to start in cold weather? 2008/12/23 10:54:28
my honda rancher does all of that stuff.
i was just about to post something about the ticking when i start it, but it usually does go away once i get out of first gear. i always have to choke it no matter what the weather is like out side.
also my pull starter is the same way it pulls out and wont go back in. i dont know what to do to fix it?
kodiak660
Respected Member
RE: are all 350 ranchers hard to start in cold weather? 2008/12/23 15:30:15
You better pull the rope start off and clean it before the seal goes out and you end up doing a complete motor rebuild.
rancher man08
Mud Maniac
RE: are all 350 ranchers hard to start in cold weather? 2008/12/23 15:40:13
i`m glad i`m not the only one with this problem i was really startin to get ****ed off.i mean its a good bike but cold weather startin suck`s donkey balls.lol
650con
Mud Master
RE: are all 350 ranchers hard to start in cold weather? 2008/12/23 16:45:30
when your cord dosent retract then what i do is hold the handle with slack in the cord the pull the rope all the way out and let it slowly pull itself back in...that trick should be in the honda owners manual as much trouble as honda has with tht...haha
RE: are all 350 ranchers hard to start in cold weather? 2008/12/23 16:47:39
I'm scared to pull mine out. lol[:D]
Jake450s
Moderator
RE: are all 350 ranchers hard to start in cold weather? 2008/12/23 17:47:31
ORIGINAL: outlanderrider
Had to resort to the pull start, which didn't work worth a ****. It's pulled all the way out and won't retract. What to do? [&o]




Start by fixing the rope starter or replacing the complete assembly, they're not free but not as much as you'd expect, and the clockspring is already all wound up for you.

If you're having hard start issues from the cold, cranking speed is everything.  Stronger signal to the CDI.  Warmer fuel/air charge from faster compression.  Better "running start" for the first "fire" to carry the engine all the way to the second "fire".  You can pull the cord out with REASONABLE effort, and blow that poor little starter motor into next week.  Pull the rope like you mean it, like you're desperate and stranded...  You can nearly double the cranking speed of a properly working electric starter.    It's a very nice thing to have working in the winter time.
Jake450s
Moderator
RE: are all 350 ranchers hard to start in cold weather? 2008/12/23 18:17:46
ORIGINAL: rancher man08

my 350  rancher is a **** to start to in cold weather is that normal?,and another thing it ticks at start up for a few seconds and then goes away are the valves out of adjustment?


They're ALL different, but here's my general unscientific observation FWIW-

It should take a choke to start it, a machine in good condition still might like the choke for a cold start right up to 75 or 80 degrees.  More than that is "fixable", less than that is pretty much par for the course.

Below fifty degrees, it's pretty normal to need the choke on, and to require a little throttle modulation to get it started and running for a few seconds, then have it sort its self out and idle fine.

Below thirty degrees, you prolly have to work with it for a few minutes before it's happy, and it's never truely happy until after you've been out and smacked on it for a while, preferrably after a short warm-up.  This will "heat soak" the engine and then it should be a happy camper.  They don't truely warm up until you really ride them, so while it'll really appreciate a short warm-up, a long one is unneeded and pretty ineffective past a certain point.
Incidentally, if your winter is cold enough (and you're rugged enough) to require a winter jet, then this is the "threshold" I'd recommend for it where you'll start seeing some positive returns.  If you don't ride that much in the winter (or at least when it's below freezing), then it's not a concern.  For limited use you're good down to zero on the factory jet so long as you're watching out for an overheat.


A couple of things to watch for-

Regular unleaded gasoline!!!!!  Regardless what the gas company calls it, the higher octane flavor does not atomise as easily, does not ignite as easily, and just does not lend it's self to cold weather as well.  Assuming that "premium" or "super" means "better for my engine" is pretty much shooting yourself in the foot.

Learn what the machine likes.  They're all a little different.  Full choke and no throttle?  Half choke and a touch of throttle?  they all have a preference.  The colder it gets, the less forgiving ANY carbureted engine is, and the harder it is to "pass" a flood and get it to run.

Don't assume that full choke is what it always want's.  It may start better with your same routine and half of a choke.  Flooding with too much fuel is harder to start than starving with too little.  Or maybe not.  Just be sure you're not fighting with it when you don't need to.  Like I said before, see what your specific machine likes...

Key on, engine off (and all other electrical gizmos off) for thirty seconds, up to one minute before the first start attempt.  There is a heating element in the carburetor to correct a completely different, unrelated, not even very likely issue with the carburetors.  Allowing that tiny heater to run half a minute to a minute before startup has a good "side effect" of pre-warming the bowels of the carb.  It's only just a little, but a little is all it takes to make a difference.

Below twenty degrees or so, hit the primer one time.  (mayyyybee two.)  don't over do it.  It works or it doesn't.  If that gets you a "start and stall", more pumps aren't better, give it the same one bump the next time.  A couple of "start and stalls" and eventually it'll go. 

And last, just as I said in my reply to outlanderrider...  The rope starter...
Yeah, UGGGGH, it sounds like work.  But, even if your battery isn't dead the rope starter still works.  If you use the electric starter and it's hesitating or not trying at all, don't be afraid to give it a few good tugs.  The extra cranking speed from the rope starter makes a HUGE difference in getting cold engines started.


As for the rattle for a few seconds.....
I can't say it's good, I can't say they all do it.  It could be numerous things.  But lots of those little 350's have done that exact same thing for a very, very long time with no further ill effects from it.  But if you're in doubt about the valve adjustment, it probably needs it done.  It's a good machine with a good engine, you should take care of it so that it'll continue to take care of you... but that "surgery" isn't going to fix a noise that dissapears that quickly.
post edited by Jake450s - 2008/12/23 18:22:33
Sammy08515
Mud Maniac
RE: are all 350 ranchers hard to start in cold weather? 2008/12/23 21:25:51
jake has the answers
the pull rope scares me IMO because when i was little my neighboors battery died and noone had any cables and he "tugged" it a little bit too hard and jerked off the handle that was a bad feeling for even me and it wasnt my bike after he cussed a few minutes and threw the handle it took 4 of us to get it started we had to jerk out a battery out of another bike and play all kinds of games with it
so In my own personal opinion i wouldnt use it unless you really felt the need to use it
and on my 350 i just keep pulling it out and back in with the engine running and it eventually goes back in to where it needs to be

and mine usually runs fine in cold weather i pull the choke all the way out and dont even touch the throttle after about 4 cranks it fires up and run it for about 2 or 3 minutes itll idle on its own no matter what the weather it wants the choke
i give her what she needs
post edited by Sammy08515 - 2008/12/23 21:28:02
chevy1500
Mud Pro
RE: are all 350 ranchers hard to start in cold weather? 2008/12/23 22:31:21
my recon would start in 30 degree wether no problem my foreman will barley run in 40 degree weather until it gets warmed up
outlanderrider
Mud Master
RE: are all 350 ranchers hard to start in cold weather? 2008/12/24 09:16:08
jake, thank you for those write-ups. i can see why you have that respected member picture under your name. [;)]
Jake450s
Moderator
RE: are all 350 ranchers hard to start in cold weather? 2008/12/24 10:57:41
ORIGINAL: Sammy08515
the pull rope scares me



It should not scare you at all.  They fail from neglect and lack of use.  The absolute best maintenance you can do for your rope starter to keep the spring working smoothly, keep the rope from rotting (or dryrotting), to keep the dogs from sticking in place, and to keep the mud and dust from building up in it if you havnt sealed it...  USE IT!!
They are a very stout rope starters when compared to, let's say a lawn mower, that gets used exclusively every time, and lasts for years and years...  The difference is that the lawn mower rope starter DOES get used.
If you're going to count on the rope starter for emergency use, you have to be able to trust it.  If you do not use it, you CAN NOT trust it.  It'll pull out and stay out, it'll pull out and come back in but not engage the engine, or you'll rip the handle right off of the rope from a rotten spot where the rope passes through the handle...  Well, the rotten rope will happen anyway, EVENTUALLY, but you can see the rope degrade long before it brakes.  Spools of rope from a small engine shop are dirt cheap and very easy to change BEFORE they break.  Afterwards you've got to count turns with the pulley and what not, but it's still not bad.  It doesn't get ugly until you take the center nut off and let the clockspring go.  Even those aren't bad to change, after you've done three hundred times or so to get it down to an art...  Whole assemblies for a 350 Rancher, pre-wound, pre-roped, four bolts and go are eighty bucks, and most of the parts are available separately. 

ORIGINAL: Sammy08515
on my 350 i just keep pulling it out and back in with the engine running and it eventually goes back in to where it needs to be...
i give her what she needs


She needs the clockspring...  You MIGHT get lucky and clean it up, but it's short lived.  Regular use prevents this from happening.  SOMETIMES...  Sometimes repeated use can get them to scrub against themselves enough to get them to start working again without taking them apart.  But again, it's short lived.
post edited by Jake450s - 2008/12/24 11:04:29
outlanderrider
Mud Master
RE: are all 350 ranchers hard to start in cold weather? 2008/12/24 15:17:53
huzzah! after i hand choked it (open the air box, take off the air filter, and cover the hole with my hand) i got it started, and 20 minutes of idling later, the pull start snapped back in! THANK YOU, again jake! [;)]